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Riparian Walk #3.1 – Boatholes Creek to Mineral Springs, Ruffy

After a winter hibernation, the acclaimed SRCMN riparian walks are back and better than ever, with this new series of six walks. The format this time is slightly different, with new routes mixed with old favorites from previous walks.

The first walk to kick off the new series and new season was the fan favorite Boatholes Creek. While technically a section of the Hughes Creek, the Boatholes nickname has been bestowed on this small stretch by the Ruffy local, as it’s characterised by numerous water pools starting from the Boathole Reserve.

The boatholes of the Hughes Creek

After having to cancel the walk two weeks previous due to extreme weather, things were once again looking hit and miss, with rain and cold temperatures being predicted for the morning of the walk. It was decided that the walk would continue with very explicit warnings given to all who RSVP’d. As luck would have it, the rain held off until the last 30 minutes, providing perfect walking conditions for 90% of the walk. But even the rain couldn’t dampen the spirits of the intrepid walkers, who soldiered on to the fabled mineral springs.

Walkers taking refuge under an impressive boulder in the gorge. Photo by Justus Hagen.

The usual resident wallabies were spotted and thankfully the tiger snakes seen on previous walks were nestled out of sight to stay warm. Salubrious wombat holes were everywhere, and rabbits had been busy digging, which when combined with the long grass made for potentially treacherous terrain. Blackberrys were seen in patches along the creek bed, but not in concentrations previously seen further downstream. Resident Geologist Neil Phillips was furiously writing notes on the changing rocks and creek beds as we descended down further into the gorge.

Tourmaline embedded in granite

The mineral springs are always a great drawcard with walkers reinvigorating themselves by sampling the mildly effervescent and highly sulfurous healing water.

The colourful source of the mineral spring water

Thanks to all of the walkers who came, to Justus Hagen for gaining permission from landholders for this walk, and to the generous landholders for allowing us access to the creek through their properties.