Welcome to the home of the Strathbogie Ranges Conservation Management Network.

Past Event

Riparian Walk #4 – Hughes Creek Gorge

The fourth walk in the series of six walks departed at 9am from Hughes Creek Rd.

Walkers were greeted with perfect walking conditions, with a mild but sunny day proving optimal for seeing the Hughes Creek Gorge at its best, while also staying nice and cool. Almost immediately, the shoes were off for the one and only mandatory creek crossing just off the road. The more adventurous and less water-in-shoe adverse among us simply strode across the creek, while for others it was a choice of rock skipping or going footware free to make the crossing.

Along the way, walkers observed the natural beauty of this granite-free section of the Hughes Creek, likening it to an outback gorge due to its sandy banks. Numerous kangaroos and wallabies were spotted, as well as some fairly large native fish. Walkers also noted the severe infestations of introduced weed species, with blackberry and gorse featuring heavily along the first section of the walk. This uncontrolled spread of weed species is an unfortunate theme observed across all of the riparian walks to date.

The walk concluded at 12:50pm, with the group setting a record pace of 2.1km/h and covering 7.86km, the fastest of our walks so far. As with previous walks, the locations of blackberry bushes were logged via GPS, and a series of geo-tagged photos has been uploaded to the SRCMN Flickr for public viewing.

If you have an interest in learning more about the Seven Creeks and Hughes Creek waterways, or just going for an interesting walk with some great people, please don’t hesitate to RSVP for our next walk in Ruffy on Saturday the 19th of May.

Thanks to all who came.

A link to the route: https://www.plotaroute.com/route/589824

Golden Pash - Golden Circle

Riparian Walk #3 – Gerars Creek

The third walk in the series of six walks kicked off at 9am from the Ruoaks Link bridge and finished on the intersection of Peters Lane and Tames Rd (at the bridge).

Severe weather warnings had been forecast, but by the start of the walk, the weather had held so it was decided to continue the walk as planned. With 4 hardcore walkers showing up, the walk begun at a brisk pace in an attempt to get a headstart on the weather. The plan nearly worked, but the inevitable happened about halfway through and the fervourous rain and wind swept in, slowly soaking the intrepid hikers as they went. Spirits remained high though, as the stunning scenery’s beauty didn’t diminish in the squall. The rain added a greater level of difficulty to an already challenging walk, making rocks and logs particularly treacherous.

Gerars Creek is a beautiful walk with some stunning rocky outcrops and natural waterfalls and waterholes. It’s relatively unexplored between bridges as the blackberries make initial access difficult. Wallabys, wombats and water-dwelling creatures (perhaps a platypus) all made an appearance.

Photos of interesting features and weed locations were taken throughout the walk and posted on the photo sharing site Flickr for public viewing.

A big thanks to Ian Cruickshank for bringing along his GPS to provide an accurate record of the walk.

If you have an interest in learning more about the Seven Creeks and Hughes Creek waterways, or just going for an interesting walk with some great people, please don’t hesitate to RSVP for our next walk in Ruffy on Saturday the 28th of April.

Thanks to all who came.

A link to the route: https://www.plotaroute.com/route/589824

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riparian Walk #1 – Polly McQuinns to Gooram Falls

The first walk in the series of six walks started at the Polly McQuinns weir and finished at the Gooram Falls car park on the Merton side (number 2).

There was a great turnout, with 28 walkers coming out to enjoy the perfect weather and beautiful scenery of the Seven Creeks Reserve.

Amongst the group were experts in Geology, Australian flora, local catchments and groundwater, bushwalking and rogaining. Along the way, walkers were treated to some amazing facts about the waterway that added another depth to the experience.

Blackberry locations were logged via GPS along the way to use as a reference for any control efforts, and the SRCMN drone had it’s maiden flight to capture some of the unique scenery from above.

Apart from a couple of hair raising moments and an appearance by a particularly large black snake, the walk went smoothly, although it concluded a bit later than expected.

If you have an interest in learning more about the Seven Creeks and Hughes Creek waterways, or just going for a walk with some great people, please don’t hesitate to RSVP for our next walk on Saturday the 24th of March.

A big thank you to all who came, and especially those who helped ferry walkers up and down the hill.

Ian Cruickshank

Map courtesy of Ian Cruickshank

Ian Cruickshank

Map courtesy of Ian Cruickshank

Riparian Walk #2 – Brookleigh Rd to Strathbogie Township

The second walk in the series of six walks kicked off at 9am from the Brookleigh Rd bridge and finished at the Strathbogie CFA Shed.

Despite the threat of heavy rain, 17 keen walker showed up to explore the upper Seven Creeks Reserve. With the thunder rolling in, the walk concluded with about 15 minutes before the rain set in, with some walkers staying on at Under the Sun cafe for a well deserved coffee and snack.

Along the way, walkers witnessed some of the residents of the Seven Creeks including Yellow-Tail Black Cockatoos, wallabies, kangaroos, various native waterbirds, and flora native to the Strathbogie riparian areas. Some of the non-natives included foxes, wandering sheep and a heap of blackberries.

Photos of interesting features and weed locations were taken throughout the walk and posted on the photo sharing site Flickr for public viewing.

A big thanks to Ian Cruickshank for bringing along his GPS to provide an accurate record of the walk.

 

If you have an interest in learning more about the Seven Creeks and Hughes Creek waterways, or just going for an interesting walk with some great people, please don’t hesitate to RSVP for our next walk on Saturday the 14th of April.

Thanks to all who came and helped out.

Map courtesy of Ian Cruickshank

Map courtesy of Ian Cruickshank

Strathbogie Forest Moth Night

A balmy evening, without moonlight nor a hint of breeze, was the perfect backdrop for our second mothing night in the Strathbogie Forest. Twenty-six people joined moth expert Steve Williams on an evening of discovery, as we waited for these little magicians to appear from their hiding places.

As daylight began to fade, they were coaxed from their secure nooks and crannies by Steve’s mercury vapour light and white sheet – among the few props a moth expert needs! The beginning was slow, but within a hour or so there were well over 100 different species at the light, some so new to science, they are as yet unnamed.

Even most of the named species, which were too numerous for us lay-people to fully appreciate, are not well-known. In fact, given that moths are one of the most ecologically important fauna groups in the forest, they are surprisingly poorly known. Moth larvae (‘caterpillars’) feed on a bewildering variety of plant-, fungi- and other material; without moth larvae, the forest would drown in its own plant debris. And all those caterpillars and the adult moths support an entire food web of insectivorous animals – from preying mantises, to spiders, to birds, bats and many mammals.

Here are a few of the evening’s more flamboyant visitors.

SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth NightSRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night SRCMN Strathbogie Moth Night

A Day with Dr James Fitzsimons

 

New and Part-Time Landholder Euroa Forum 2017

The Strathbogie Ranges CMN is excited to bring you this year’s introductory event for New and Part-Time Landholders.
This is a great event for those who would like to learn more about the area, meet some locals and get their advice and expertise on a variety of topics affecting new landholders.
If you haven’t attended any SRCMN events before, this is a fantastic way to get involved, and meet some fellow New and Part-Time Landholders along the way.

Time: 11:00am to 2:00pm with morning tea and a light lunch provided.

Speakers: Janet Hagen, Bert Lobert, Karen Brisbane (GBCMA), Cathy Olive (Euroa Arboretum)

Location: Sat 26th of August 2017 – The Old Flour Mill Gallery, Euroa

Themes & Topics:

  • Property Management
  • Environmental Restoration/Enhancement
  • Support Opportunities
  • Financial Grants
  • Local Geology
  • Environmental Issues

Please register your interest by emailing us at strathbogierangescmn@gmail.com

 

Revegetation Day – Ruffy

29/06/2017

On a sunny but bitterly cold Sunday in Ruffy, the SRCMN held a revegetation information event for local landholders. The aim of the day was to get the attendees thinking about flora on their land and covered topics such as:

  • The advantages of revegetating cleared land
  • The different species of seeds available
  • How to collect your own seed
  • Where to buy seeds and saplings
  • Different methods of planting
  • Site preparation
  • Tree protection
  • Planning for climate change
  • Available grants

A field walk was conducted by Janet and Justus Hagen at their property in Ruffy, before the group moved on to the Ruffy Community Centre for lunch, a short presentation and some further discussion.
It was fantastic to see such an wide array of attendees from such a variety of backgrounds.
Justus and Janet were a wealth of knowledge and left every attendee with a new understanding of the role of native trees on local properties.