Welcome to the home of the Strathbogie Ranges Conservation Management Network.

Past Event

Riparian Walk #6 – Emu Waterholes Creek

The last, and by far the coldest of our riparian walks began on a dead still and very frosty Ruffy morning. Nonetheless the turnout was great with every walker set to make the most of the perfect winters morning.

The Emu Waterholes Creek walk was the easiest in the series, and ambling along the gentle curves of the waterway was the  best way to see out what has been a spectacular series of walks. With a decent portion of the walk traversing private property, the proliferation of blackberrys and other weeds species were mild compared to previous walks. A diverse array of native gums, fungi and reeds were just a few of the features noted along the way, with a fleeting appearance made by a few startled wallabys. A shy echidna was also spotted after having firmly dug itself in to the base of an old stump.

The SRCMN drone was again engaged to get some aerial shots of the spectacular gorge at the halfway mark. Despite the cold battery warnings, it once again show us what we were missing from our limited, ground level views.

The SRCMN would like to thank everyone who participated in this series of walks. The relentless positive attitudes and willingness to help out fellow walkers made our lives a lot easier, and it was a true pleasure to meet both locals and those from far afield.

 

 

 

Fungimap – How to use a fungi app with Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher

The final event in the 2018 Fungi Festival saw a grey but relatively mild winters morning after a day of heavy rain; perfect fungi hunting weather. With a quick introductory talk on how to use the iNaturalist app from Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher, attendees loaded up their phones and set off hunting. The Euroa Arboretum proved fertile hunting grounds , with the earlier rain giving a slight helping hand to the various species in the areas.

After the successful hunt, it was back to the Euroa Library for a spot of lunch and information on how to upload the observations.

The SRCMN would like to thank all of those who made the Fungimap events possible, including everyone who attended (from far and wide), with special thanks to Dr Sapphire and Lyn Allison for taking time out of their busy schedules to come and increase our fungi knowledge.

Fungimap – Fungi of the Goulburn Broken with Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher

The second last event in 2018’s Fungi Festival drew a crowd of both locals and dedicated fungi enthusiasts out of their homes on a chilly Friday night. Dr Sapphire McMullan-Fisher offered an introduction to the not-for-profit citizen science organisation called Fungimap, who work to increase fungi knowledge and conservation, as well as bring people with an interest in Australian macrofungi together.

Allowing the public to easily submit their fungi observations through the Fungimap web page, or through the iNaturalist app or web page means that anyone with a keen interest and an eye for fungi can begin contributing to Australia’s fungi knowledge. With speculation that around 50% of Australia’s fungi remains formally undocumented, there is a huge need for people to get out and start recording the weird and wonderful species in their local area. Dr Sapphire noted that for those keen on exploring bush for these elusive species, proper hygiene is a must to prevent the spread of fungi to areas where it’s not welcome. This means cleaning dirt from the soles of shoes, properly cleaning and drying coats and pants, and using solvents to kill long lived spores.

Fungi Festival Malaysian Feast and Intro Talk with Alison Pouliot

The first event in the 2018 SRCMN Fungi Festival lineup was huge, with over 70 fungi enthusiasts turning out for a short intro talk and Malaysian feast at the Strathbogie Memorial Hall. With the Hall near maximum capacity, everyone sat enthralled as the fervent Alison Pouliot delivered her introductory talk to the inquisitive crowd. Even those who had never given the world of Fungus too much thought had their curiosities ineluctably roused by the fascinating details of the fungi kingdom.

The SRCMN would like to thank all of those who made the event possible, including all of the tireless volunteers, cooks and participants of the Fungi Festival’s largest event.

Fungi Festival – Local Fungal Curiosities Workshop with Alison Pouliot

Following a highly entertaining workshop and Malaysian feast the previous night, the full day workshop with fungus expert Alison Pouliot captured the imagination of those who wanted to delve deeper into the bizarre world of fungus. Held at the Strathbogie Memorial Hall, attendees bore witness to a spectacular array of local, freshly harvested fungi. With each variety carefully separated and labelled, the display tables granted people a unique snapshot of the various seasonal fungi varieties that could be found in the local area.

Starting with morning tea and a presentation, attendees then gathered around the fungi laden tables to discuss the uses, toxicity, evolution, attitudes, smells, sights, sounds (not a typo) and even breeding habits of the colourful varieties before them. After a brief lunch break at Under The Sun Cafe in Strathbogie, participants had a chance to get their hands dirty on a short field trip up Mt Wombat. There, they found several native fungi varieties that may have otherwise gone unnoticed. After all of the fungi had been hunted, it was back to the Hall for a spot of afternoon tea and some goodbyes.

The SRCMN would like to thank all of those who made the event possible, including everyone who came along to increase their fungi knowledge, and especially to Alison Pouliot who’s endless knowledge was rivaled only by her incredible enthusiasm.

 

Riparian Walk #5 – Boatholes Creek Ruffy

The fifth walk in the series of six walks departed at 9am from the Boatholes Rd bridge in Ruffy.

The walk started rather cold, with a small campfire warming walkers before they departed. The weather steadily improved throughout the day with optimal temperatures for 17 strong walkers. Even with more than a few creek crossing thrown in, the group maintained an enviable pace and stamina throughout the 6.4km of the walk, talking 4 hours from start to finish. A quick excursion to the Ruffy mineral springs capped off a beautifully successful day, even if the effervescent water was a bit too odorous for some. The walkers were then ferried back to their vehicles at the bridge, wrapping up the whole exercise around 2pm.

Along the way, walkers were treated to the spectacular range of botanical and geological features of the Boatholes Creek. This really is one of the most scenic walks in the Strathbogie shire, incorporating some of the best bits of all of our riparian walks to date. Walkers bore witness to the unexpected sight of a group of 4 wallabies being chased by a fox across the bank of the creek.  A few kangaroos were spotted, but it was the wombats who were the most populous residents of the creek. Introduced weed species were not as severe as some previous walks, but blackberries were once again the most prolific species found. The walk was notable for the prevalence of European Wasp nests found along the way.

As with previous walks, the locations of blackberry bushes were logged via GPS, and a series of geo-tagged photos has been uploaded to the SRCMN Flickr for public viewing.

If you have an interest in learning more about the Seven Creeks and Hughes Creek waterways, or just going for an interesting walk with some great people, please don’t hesitate to RSVP for our next walk in Ruffy on Saturday the 23rd of June.

Thanks to all who came, and to Ian Cruickshank for the maps.

A link to the route: https://www.plotaroute.com/route/590345

    

Riparian Walk #4 – Hughes Creek Gorge

The fourth walk in the series of six walks departed at 9am from Hughes Creek Rd.

Walkers were greeted with perfect walking conditions, with a mild but sunny day proving optimal for seeing the Hughes Creek Gorge at its best, while also staying nice and cool. Almost immediately, the shoes were off for the one and only mandatory creek crossing just off the road. The more adventurous and less water-in-shoe adverse among us simply strode across the creek, while for others it was a choice of rock skipping or going footware free to make the crossing.

Along the way, walkers observed the natural beauty of this granite-free section of the Hughes Creek, likening it to an outback gorge due to its sandy banks. Numerous kangaroos and wallabies were spotted, as well as some fairly large native fish. Walkers also noted the severe infestations of introduced weed species, with blackberry and gorse featuring heavily along the first section of the walk. This uncontrolled spread of weed species is an unfortunate theme observed across all of the riparian walks to date.

The walk concluded at 12:50pm, with the group setting a record pace of 2.1km/h and covering 7.86km, the fastest of our walks so far. As with previous walks, the locations of blackberry bushes were logged via GPS, and a series of geo-tagged photos has been uploaded to the SRCMN Flickr for public viewing.

Thanks to all who came.

A link to the route: https://www.plotaroute.com/route/589824

Golden Pash - Golden Circle

Riparian Walk #3 – Gerars Creek

The third walk in the series of six walks kicked off at 9am from the Ruoaks Link bridge and finished on the intersection of Peters Lane and Tames Rd (at the bridge).

Severe weather warnings had been forecast, but by the start of the walk, the weather had held so it was decided to continue the walk as planned. With 4 hardcore walkers showing up, the walk begun at a brisk pace in an attempt to get a headstart on the weather. The plan nearly worked, but the inevitable happened about halfway through and the fervourous rain and wind swept in, slowly soaking the intrepid hikers as they went. Spirits remained high though, as the stunning scenery’s beauty didn’t diminish in the squall. The rain added a greater level of difficulty to an already challenging walk, making rocks and logs particularly treacherous.

Gerars Creek is a beautiful walk with some stunning rocky outcrops and natural waterfalls and waterholes. It’s relatively unexplored between bridges as the blackberries make initial access difficult. Wallabys, wombats and water-dwelling creatures (perhaps a platypus) all made an appearance.

Photos of interesting features and weed locations were taken throughout the walk and posted on the photo sharing site Flickr for public viewing.

A big thanks to Ian Cruickshank for bringing along his GPS to provide an accurate record of the walk.

Thanks to all who came.

A link to the route: https://www.plotaroute.com/route/589824

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fungi Festival – The Puff Ball – Pre-event description

 

Back by popular demand the Puff Ball is an opportunity to dance, talk, and eat wonderful locally prepared food. Ticket price is for dance only but for an extra $5 you can also enjoy a light meal at the venue. Please send a text to 0458 375 913 if you would like to book a meal. Meet for dinner and a slide presentation by the Strathbogie Forest group from 6pm in the supper room of the hall before the music starts. The band Couch Grass will once again talk us expertly through the dances. Table bookings for groups of up to 8 people are also possible.

Where: Violet Town Memorial Hall

When: 6pm, Saturday the 2nd of June, 2018

Click here to book your ticket.

Riparian Walk #2 – Brookleigh Rd to Strathbogie Township

The second walk in the series of six walks kicked off at 9am from the Brookleigh Rd bridge and finished at the Strathbogie CFA Shed.

Despite the threat of heavy rain, 17 keen walker showed up to explore the upper Seven Creeks Reserve. With the thunder rolling in, the walk concluded with about 15 minutes before the rain set in, with some walkers staying on at Under the Sun cafe for a well deserved coffee and snack.

Along the way, walkers witnessed some of the residents of the Seven Creeks including Yellow-Tail Black Cockatoos, wallabies, kangaroos, various native waterbirds, and flora native to the Strathbogie riparian areas. Some of the non-natives included foxes, wandering sheep and a heap of blackberries.

Photos of interesting features and weed locations were taken throughout the walk and posted on the photo sharing site Flickr for public viewing.

A big thanks to Ian Cruickshank for bringing along his GPS to provide an accurate record of the walk.

Thanks to all who came and helped out.

Map courtesy of Ian Cruickshank

Map courtesy of Ian Cruickshank